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Teff Waffle

Teff Waffle

Adapted from Whole Grains Every Day, Every Way, by Lorna Sass Many thanks to sister-in-law and fab cook Janice Kay for the recipe and the first bag of Teff Flour that nudged me into action and made these waffles happen!

I have changed very little from the original fine recipe. I use sorghum molasses -- "sweet sorghum syrup" -- instead of the combination of white sugar and molasses in the original. I skipped the instructions for starting with whole teff grain and grinding your own. (I used Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Teff Flour.) I rewrote the instructions to mirror the way the work seemed to flow. The work, in this case, is worth it.

I like these waffles without any topping, and they are friendly toward savory toppings as well as sweet ones. The banana topping in the original recipe is properly over-the-top delicious.

For the caramelized banana topping: 3 large, ripe, firm bananas 3 Tablespoons fresh unsalted butter 3 Tablespoons (packed) brown sugar or dark brown sugar Pinch of good salt

  1. Slice the bananas into thirds crossways, and then slice the thirds lengthwise. You will have 18 pieces.
  2. Melt the butter in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. (I use a cast iron skillet.)
  3. Add the brown sugar and salt; stir until well blended and bubbling.
  4. Turn up the heat to medium high.
  5. Carefully put the banana slices, cut side down, in the bubbling mix.
  6. Cook until lightly browned on the bottom, about 7-8 minutes.
  7. Turn carefully with tongs or a spatula, and brown lightly on the rounded side.
  8. Either put in a serving dish or leave on the stove and reheat slightly just before serving with the hot, crisp waffles.
Bob's Red Mill Teff Flour

Bob's Red Mill Teff Flour

For the waffles:

Lorna Sass's headnote for this recipe won me over: "If you use brown teff -- the most commonly available type -- these waffles will be deep and chocolaty, with a texture so light that no one will believe they are made of whole grains."  It was the "texture so light" part that most appealed to me. And the waffles are wonderfully light, and free of gluten.

Turn on your waffle iron so it can be ready when you are. I learned that teff browns more quickly than wheat flour, so I used a setting that is just short of full high on my particular waffle iron. You will need to experiment to find the right setting.

Mix together well in a large measuring cup or bowl: 1 1/2 cups brown teff flour 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon good salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

In a small saucepan, melt: 6 Tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter

Remove the saucepan from heat and add, whisking together thoroughly: 1 1/2 cups well-shaken buttermilk (and have more on hand in case you need it) 1 Tablespoon pure sorghum molasses, also known as "sweet sorghum syrup"

In a large mixer bowl or by hand, beat until very light and thick: 2 large eggs

Now, assemble and cook your waffles.

  1. Add the butter-buttermilk-sorghum mixture to the beaten eggs and stir well.
  2. Gently fold in the teff flour mixture. If very thick, add more buttermilk. The mixture should be about "medium milkshake" thick. It should have some substance, but spread easily and quickly when you pour it into your hot waffle iron.
  3. Every waffle iron is different, so enjoy taking a scientific approach to finding out how to make this recipe work well with your equipment. It may take a few tries to reach perfection.
  4. I used a bit of high heat nonstick spray on my hot waffle iron. My best waffles with this batter result from using a medium-high heat setting for the waffle iron, spraying the iron with a bit of high heat nonstick spray before each waffle, and pouring in batter so it covers a bit more half of the surface before shutting the lid. This batter expands! It is easy to create Waffle Mess if you fill your waffle iron nearly full of batter.
  5. You can keep finished waffles warm in a 200 degree F. toaster oven or regular oven, while you cook the whole batch. Or you may not need this tactic, if anyone else is around to help you eat the waffles as they come straight from the iron, crispy, brown, and delectable.
  6. Serve with caramelized bananas, or any other topping that suits your fancy.

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