Sprouts: What's New in Local Food in the Bluegrass

Baby Garlic

Baby Garlic

Spring brings such wonderful blooms and tender green bits to eat, along with less edible new beginnings. A few of many good new beginnings in the Bluegrass:

  • Soon we may buy fresh foods at a downtown market. Shorty's Urban Market, 163 West Short Street in downtown Lexington, promises to be "A new city style grocery store in downtown Lexington." The ribbon cutting takes place Saturday, April 30, so perhaps its doors will open soon.
  • Alfalfa Restaurant offers Saturday Market omelettes and a new wine list. Longtime favorite restaurant, Alfalfa, seems just to be coming into her full beauty at 38 years of age. Alfalfa supported local farms and offered locally grown produce before anyone knew it was cool. Now, with beloved past owner Jake Gibbs returning to partial ownership after an 11-year break, lots of positive changes are underway. For example, on Saturday mornings, follow the Alfalfa wagon through the Lexington Farmers Market on Saturday mornings and down the street to 141 E. Main for a perfect Kentucky omelette made with market-fresh ingredients. Jake is leading a wine list update, too. Check out the crisp new organic Santa Julia Torrontes (white) and the creamy, luscious Evodia Garnache (red). The prices are Alfalfa style, and the food is better than ever.
  • Eventually the city may pick up our food waste and compost it. Business Lexington recently announced that Bluegrass Pride and our local government's Division of Waste Management are piloting a food waste pick-up and compost program in a small part of Lexington near Clays Mill Road. This is wonderfully exciting news, since other good waste management initiatives in our town also began with pilots, and fairly quickly expanded. Imagine being able to compost dairy, small amounts of meats, fats, and the other foods that outdoor home composters do not handle well. Very excited about this.
  • East Enders can learn and get supplies for building rain gardens. The Living Arts and Science Center will host two Rain Garden Workshops for residents of Lexington's East End. For a wildly affordable two dollars, participants will learn about rain gardens, and will receive a rain barrel, soil, and seeds. See information in the copy of the event flyer below, or call 859.252.5222. Neighbor Felice Salmon is coordinating the workshop, which is funded by local government's Department of Environmental Quality. Felice hosts the delightful blog, The Neighborly Way: The Art of Loving Locally.
Flyer about East End rain garden workshops

Flyer about East End rain garden workshops

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