Fresh Bytes, October 6, 2011

 Fresh zucchini ribbons, ready for a flash in the pan

Fresh zucchini ribbons, ready for a flash in the pan

Food news of interest:

Seedleaf's communal cooking event, Soup's On, happens in Lexington on two Thursdays this month. Make tart green tomato soup for yourself, friends, and the hungry on October 6. Come back to build another soup with local, seasonal ingredients on Thursday, October 20.

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All of us are invited to monthly First Friday breakfasts (facebook) provided by the UK Sustainable Ag Systems and Food Systems Work Group to build community connections, increase knowledge, and encourage sustainable ag practitioners. Here is information on this month's breakfast, which will feature an expert on basic poultry management. The October First Friday breakfast is (you guessed it) Friday, October 7, 7:30 - 9:30 AM.

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To be part of Kentucky foods present and future, come to the Lexington Convention Center Saturday, October 8, for the Incredible Food Show. No description or stories can equal being there for this event, with its non-stop demonstrations and classes, 100 exhibits (most with delicious samples), fine local mega-star chefs, and celebrity chefs Michael and Bryan Voltaggio. Be early and get one of 300 free Kentucky Proud breakfasts, cooked by Sullivan University people. Doors open at 9:00 AM. Stay all day to learn and luxuriate in the goodness of Kentucky food. The price, with an online coupon or one from the excellent Sunday newspaper supplement, is $13, including general admission seats for the Voltaggio brothers' cooking demonstrations.

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Big downtown foodie/drinkie (?) news in Lexington: Friends are launching West Sixth Brewing Company, a new community-friendly craft beer brewery and tap room, at the corner of West Sixth Street, Jefferson, and Bellaire (and with an eventual front on the Legacy Trail.) The new beer destination will anchor The Bread Box, a multi-use space that will include FoodChain (facebook), a sustainable agriculture and education enterprise with aquaponics as a central feature.

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Stella Parks, of the inimitable BraveTart, adds pizazz to Gilt Taste with her interesting, detailed, The Unknown History of the Red Velvet Cake, and her seriously overhauled, updated, set-aside-a-day-for-baking-therapy recipe for Red (Wine) Velvet Cake with Cream Cheese German Buttercream Frosting. Kudos to Lexington food photographer (and professional baker) Sarah Jane Sanders, who made the gorgeous photos for the feature.

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What a notion: urban agriculture and urban design should get married! That's the premise of a Carrot City: Creating Places for Urban Agriculture, described here. Here's a quote from the story:

Ranging from ambitious urban plans to simple measures for growing food at home, the projects demonstrate what happens when city planning and architecture consider food production a requirement of design. The spectacular results include more community gardens, greenhouses that are tucked under raised highways, walls that bring greenery into dense city blocks, and green roofs on schools and large apartment buildings that can be tended and harvested by students and residents alike.

[Hat tip @urbanagtv (twitter) for this and the next two items.]

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Urban farming gets fed and watered in some cities: In Chicago, the Rahm Emanuel administration gets credit for passing significant new policies supporting large-scale ag: Chicago Urban Farming: City Council Approves New Ordinance, from huffingtonpost.com. And in Flint, Michigan, "City Hall is partnering with Michigan State University to develop a strategic plan for urban agriculture in Flint, including improving inner-city access to fresh produce and identifying proper zoning policies for urban gardens," described in City Hall joining Flint's urban agriculture movement, by Kristin Longley of the Flint Journal, published at mlive.com.

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Rural areas are suffering as they lose grocery stores. In some places, residents organize toward a better outcome: Rural grocery stores fade, but some towns fight back, from the Christian Science Monitor.

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Last sip: good news for some of us who go to bed looking forward to that one cup of Caffe Marco Mexico (Chiapas) Light Roast we will have the next morning: Caffeinated Women May Be Fighting Depression With Every Cup, from npr.org

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