Smells Like Cinnamon Roll Season

 Roll out the dough

Roll out the dough

Tonight the predicted temperature in the central Bluegrass begins with a digit not seen for months: "3." Our first fall dip into the 30s, following a greyish 40ish day, makes me think of cinnamon rolls, made from scratch. Long-time readers of Savoring Kentucky will not find this surprising. Newer readers, please note that I grew up thinking it quite normal to have either homemade cinnamon rolls or homemade doughnuts for breakfast on Sunday mornings, and homemade yeast rolls for dinner at least a couple of times a week. Ruth and Lisle -- Mother and Dad -- believed in a weekly roll ritual. The recipes and procedures are spelled out fully on this site:

Mother and Dad's Saturday Night Rolls: The essential dough that must be made and chilled at least eight hours before using

Gramps's Cinnamon Rolls, Apricot Rolls, Lemon-Honey-Pecan Rolls: Baked deliciousness built from the Saturday night roll dough

Mimi's Homemade Doughnuts: Fried heaven - and so much easier than you think!

And so, starting with rolling out the chilled dough, pictured above, this post will picture the cinnamon roll process, which has many steps, none hard, and all pleasing to touch and smell.

 Melt butter

Melt butter

Melt butter.

 Spread the melted butter on the dough

Spread the melted butter on the dough

Spread the melted butter on the rolled out dough.

 Sprinkle on brown sugar, cinnamon, and nuts, if you're using them

Sprinkle on brown sugar, cinnamon, and nuts, if you're using them

Sprinkle brown sugar, cinnamon, and nuts -- if you like them -- on top of the melted butter.

 Roll!

Roll!

Roll the dough into a log, starting at a long edge, and tuck a bit as you go. Don't worry about perfection. This dough and these rolls turn out well almost no matter what.

 Slice the roll and put the slices into a greased baking pan to rise

Slice the roll and put the slices into a greased baking pan to rise

When the dough is rolled, slice across it with a sharp knife to create individual cinnamon rolls.

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Place the slices close to each other (for soft sides) in a buttered baking dish. Cover lightly with a barely damp cloth and let the rolls rise in a warm place at least 90 minutes, until they are doubled in size.

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Bake at 350 degrees until golden brown, usually about 20 - 25 minutes.

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While the rolls bake -- and perfume your house and perhaps your entire block with cinnamon goodness -- make a simple confectioner's sugar glaze. (Remember, the recipe includes specific amounts and detailed instructions.)

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Expect this result. Depending on the age of the eaters, you may even expect someone to clean out the glaze and cinnamon-y bits from the baking pan.

Growing up, my family thrived on this weekly tradition. In my adult life, cinnamon rolls are celebration food, something served to family, neighbors, loved ones, or hungry strangers to share the indisputable evidence that life is sweet.

Kentucky notes: Growing up, we made this treasured food with milk, butter, and eggs from the farm, and everything else had to be bought. Today, I use local Weisenberger All Purpose flour, Elmwood Stock Farm eggs, and the milk and butter come from nearby. Now we just need some Kentucky sources of brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt! A sorghum or honey variation with Kentucky black walnuts may be in my future.

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The world is coming to visit central Kentucky this year for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games. To help our visitors know more about Kentucky's food and food ways, Savoring Kentucky is rolling out 116 Savory Kentucky Bites, one for each of the 100 days before WEG begins, and 16 for the days during WEG, September 25 - October 10. Today's Savory Bite is number  109.